Dildo wielding ex-cop is now a registered Lakewood sex offender

LAKEWOOD, OH – For the next 15 years Kenneth R. Bolton has to register with the county he lives in as a sex offender because he rubbed a dildo between the legs of two women stopped for an East Cleveland traffic violation in 2017.   Bolton was convicted in October 2017 and sentenced to 6 months at Allen Oakwood Correctional Institute in Lima. 

Bolton’s attorney, Fernando Mack, filed for judicial release to get the sex freak ex-cop out of jail after two months.  He’s now living in Lakewood on Woodward.  His wife, Tiffany, finally got a probate judge to dissolve the marriage she filed to end in 2014 on November 29, 2018.

According to state sex offender records, Bolton is employed in Medina for a tobacco and cigar business connected to two of his former co-workers.

Registered sex offender and ex-Cleveland cop Kenneth R. Bolton now works for a Medina cigar company connected to ex-offender tax cheat and tobacco trafficker Scott Gardner. The dirty cop was recently promoted to “captain” by East Cleveland Mayor Brandon King and now leads the city’s detective bureau.

One is a Scott Gardner who heads East Cleveland’s detective bureau as a police captain.  Gardner originally owned the tobacco and cigar store that employs Bolton with his partner, Phillip Labondano, under the name “Medina Cigar.”  The two were charged in 2014 with felony trafficking in tobacco products, non-filing and non-payment of taxes by Medina County Prosecutor Dean Holman for running their criminal enterprise.  Both pled guilty to misdemeanors.

Gardner was indicted by Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Michael O’Malley less than two months after his Medina county indictment on felony charges of failing to report over $22,000 in income.  Gardner also didn’t pay employee withholding taxes.  His second guilty plea brought misdemeanor instead of felony convictions in the second county.

After his Medina county indictment Gardner and Labandano appear to have entered a relationship with  ex-East Cleveland cop Matthew Balli when Ohio’s Secretary of State dissolved Medina Cigar, Inc. for non-payment of taxes. 

Balli then created a new name for the 307 E. Washington Street address with Ohio’s secretary of state and did not register “Medina Cigar & Tobacco” as either an LLC or corporation.  He registered only the name.   

It is unknown to EJBNEWS at this time if the “new management” at the business Gardner turned over to him is under Balli’s “MJPB Holdings, LLC” he registered with the secretary of state on December 10, 2012.  Balli is also shown as incorporating GNM General Contractors on April 8, 2008.

Matthew Balli of LItchfield, Ohio registered a new name for the business Scott Gardner and his partner owned and put up an “under new management” sign to keep the business alive. Balli is second from the right and is now one of sex offender Ken Bolton’s new bosses.

Like Gardner, Bolton’s current boss has his own checkered history with the East Cleveland police department.

In 2000 Balli drove an East Cleveland police vehicle into Geauga county to Chesterland where he assaulted a woman who’d ended their relationship.  After the assault Balli fled Chesterland police who finally caught and arrested him.

In 2007 Balli threatened to shoot the city’s former mayor in the “back of th e head.”  Balli, Gardner and Bolton were all employed with East Cleveland.

Currently, Balli is a “person of interest” in a federal investigation of the New Amsterdam police department where he was once listed as being “appointed” to the city by a mayor who’d never met him. 

David Cimperman, a former East Cleveland cop, added at least 12 of his retired and current city cop buddies like Balli to New Amsterdam’s roster.  The part-time chief of police then forwarded the information to the Ohio Peace Officer Training Academy managed by the state’s attorney general without the mayor’s knowledge or approval. 

The scheme was to let Balli and the other 11 ex-East Cleveland cops keep peace officer credentials so they could work for Gardner’s C-PACS armed security business and Tenable Protective Services.   Cimperman purchased two public safety vehicles through New Amsterdam’s purchasing department, according to the chief of police who replaced him.

Bolton’s name and picture do not appear among the workers employed at the Medina Cigar & Tobacco shop now  under Balli’s “new management.”  The business is listed only as his place of employment and does not describe what he does for the business that’s about a 30 minute drive from his Lakewood residence.

Eric Jonathan Brewer

Cleveland's most influential journalist and East Cleveland's most successful mayor is an East Saint Louis, Illinois native whose father led the city's petition drive in 1969 to elect the first black mayor in 1971. Eric is an old-school investigative reporter whose 40-year body of editorial work has been demonstrably effective. No local journalist is feared or respected more.

Trained in newspaper publishing by the legendary Call & Post Publisher William Otis Walker in 1978 when it was the nation's 5th largest Black-owned publication, Eric has published and edited 13 local, regional and statewide publications across Ohio. Adding to his publishing and reporting resume is Eric's career in government. Eric served as the city's highest paid part-time Special Assistant to ex-Cleveland Mayor Michael R. White. He served as Chief of Staff to ex-East Cleveland Mayor Emmanuel Onunwor; and Chief of Communications to the late George James in his capacity as the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority's first Black executive director. Eric was appointed to serve as a member of the state's Financial Planning & Supervision Commission to guide the East Cleveland school district out of fiscal emergency and $20 million deficit. Former U.S. HUD Secretary Alphonso Jackson told Eric in his D.C. office he was the only mayor in the nation simultaneously-managing a municipal block grant program. Eric wrote the city's $2.2 million Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant application. A HUD Inspector General audit of his management of the block grant program resulted in "zero" audit findings.

As a newspaper publisher, Eric has used his insider's detailed knowledge of government and his publications to lead the FBI and state prosecutors to investigations that resulted in criminal prosecutions of well-known elected officials in Ohio; and have helped realign Cleveland's political landscape with the defeat of candidates and issues he's exposed. Eric's stories led to the indictments of the late Governor George Voinovich's brother, Paul Voinovich of the V Group, and four associates. He asked the FBI to investigate the mayor he'd served as chief of staff for public corruption; and testified in three federal trials for the prosecution. He forced former Cuyahoga County Coroner Dr. Elizabeth Balraj to admit her investigations of police killings were fraudulent; and to issue notices to local police that her investigators would control police killing investigations. Eric's current work has resulted in Cuyahoga County Judge John Russo accepting the criminal complaint he guided an activist to file against 24 civil rights-violating police officers in the city he once led for operating without valid peace officer credentials. USA Today reporters picked up on Eric's police credentials reporting from his social media page and made it national.

Eric is the author of of his first book, "Fight Police License Plate Spying," which examines the FBI and local police misuse of the National Crime Information Center criminal records history database. An accomplished trumpet player and singer whose friendship with Duke Fakir of the Four Tops resulted in his singing the show's closing song, "Can't Help Myself": Curtis Sliwa of New York's Guardian Angels counts Eric among his founding chapter leaders from the early 1980's role as an Ohio organizer of over 300 volunteer crime fighters in Cleveland, Columbus and Youngstown, Ohio. For his work as a young man Eric was recognized by Cleveland's Urban League as it's 1983 Young Man of the Year.

Known in Cleveland for his encyclopedic knowledge of government and history, and intimately-connected with the region's players, every local major media outlet in Cleveland has picked up on one of Eric's stories since 1979. There is no mainstream newspaper, television or radio outlet in Cleveland that does not include an interview with Eric Jonathan Brewer in its archives over the past 40 years.

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